Fuck you Tumblr

anne O'nymous

Well-Known Member
Modder
Jun 10, 2017
1,537
1,552
#24
Pornhub said they will take everyone who works on NSFW contents in.
You see, that's my biggest fear with all the fuss around adult content. MindGeek already killed the XXX classical industry, took control to more than half of the inline XXX industry by forcing their competitors to crash or sell at a low price, and now they targets the home workers...
But don't see it as a chance, it's more a bad fate. They are the bitches exploiters denounced in the different open letters addressed to Patreon when they started their ban. They don't care about the content, the only thing they want is the money. Yes, you'll be able to be hosted here or there by them, just wait to discover what price they'll ask for this...
 

yoyomistro

Well-Known Member
Jan 15, 2017
881
697
#25
You see, that's my biggest fear with all the fuss around adult content. MindGeek already killed the XXX classical industry, took control to more than half of the inline XXX industry by forcing their competitors to crash or sell at a low price, and now they targets the home workers...
But don't see it as a chance, it's more a bad fate. They are the bitches exploiters denounced in the different open letters addressed to Patreon when they started their ban. They don't care about the content, the only thing they want is the money. Yes, you'll be able to be hosted here or there by them, just wait to discover what price they'll ask for this...
Yea, it's kinda crazy how they took over the porn industry from the shadows...
 
Likes: OldmenKing

Volta

Active Member
Apr 27, 2017
372
307
#27
If we ignore the reasons behind tumblr sticking a fork in it's own ass and proclaiming "I'm done" for a moment, the more interesting thing will be watching where the 18+ content providers, especially the writers, which i admit is what i'm aware of tumblr for at all, will go after the "tumblrpocalypse". Will standard blog sites follow suite, panic and drop the portcullis? will a unanimous replacement appear? or will they just scatter to the wind and never be quite as centralised ever again.

It's interesting how big internet companies are starting to get really twitchy about adult content in the last few years, what changed? is there a particular peculiarity that as a UK resident I've missed that explains this, perhaps some new laws in the US or a spate of prosecutions?

Also i understand what was mentioned about MindGeek (pornhub et. al.), they may as well have said "free market share, sign me up", like bloody crows on a corpse.
 
Likes: yoyomistro

uradamus

Well-Known Member
Jan 4, 2018
610
449
#28
The only reason I can recall ever visiting tumblr was to check the source links to some SFM stuff I found on *booru sites. Then the only reason I eventually signed up for a tumblr account was back when they changed things up so you had to have an account to view NSFW content. Even then I half assed their signup process to give them as little info as possible and not set any preferences or anything. The main plus to this is that now I never have a reason to go back to their shitty site ever again. It's just a pain that it will be a tad harder to find the personal pages of a few artists for a little while until they get resettled somewhere else and source links get updated. I suppose some may just figure it isn't worth the hassle and decide not to reupload their stuff elsewhere, which is a shame.
 
Sep 28, 2017
55
44
#29
If we ignore the reasons behind tumblr sticking a fork in it's own ass and proclaiming "I'm done" for a moment, the more interesting thing will be watching where the 18+ content providers, especially the writers, which i admit is what i'm aware of tumblr for at all, will go after the "tumblrpocalypse". Will standard blog sites follow suite, panic and drop the portcullis? will a unanimous replacement appear? or will they just scatter to the wind and never be quite as centralised ever again.

It's interesting how big internet companies are starting to get really twitchy about adult content in the last few years, what changed? is there a particular peculiarity that as a UK resident I've missed that explains this, perhaps some new laws in the US or a spate of prosecutions?

Also i understand what was mentioned about MindGeek (pornhub et. al.), they may as well have said "free market share, sign me up", like bloody crows on a corpse.
politically speaking, operation choke point, SESTA, and shitty old fucks in congress not understanding internet, and shitty corporate greedy fucks.
 
Likes: OldmenKing

Volta

Active Member
Apr 27, 2017
372
307
#30
politically speaking, operation choke point, SESTA, and shitty old fucks in congress not understanding internet, and shitty corporate greedy fucks.
From the little background digging on the two pieces of legislation you mentioned as far as i can see even the patreon/paypal stuff that's been going on is in part due to Operation choke point, it basically forces money service sites to police their clients on a moral level, notably in terms of "sites that seem at risk of fraudulent activity", not sites that are in fact fraudulent and of course porn is always considered seedy and therefore would fall under this term, especially if people in congress know sweet FA about the industry.

SESTA on the other hand just seems to give a greater freedom to prosecute internet based companies that use real women and children in situations that would be considered prostitution or fall under that umbrella, personals and perhaps cam-sites, but i can't see how it would effect tumblr. good calls on both though, as a Brit i hadn't heard of either of these.
 
Sep 28, 2017
55
44
#31
From the little background digging on the two pieces of legislation you mentioned as far as i can see even the patreon/paypal stuff that's been going on is in part due to Operation choke point, it basically forces money service sites to police their clients on a moral level, notably in terms of "sites that seem at risk of fraudulent activity", not sites that are in fact fraudulent and of course porn is always considered seedy and therefore would fall under this term, especially if people in congress know sweet FA about the industry.

SESTA on the other hand just seems to give a greater freedom to prosecute internet based companies that use real women and children in situations that would be considered prostitution or fall under that umbrella, personals and perhaps cam-sites, but i can't see how it would effect tumblr. good calls on both though, as a Brit i hadn't heard of either of these.
SESTA and FOSTA is actually what drove sites like discord and reddit to a mass self-moderation this year against loli content, the two bills make it so that the host site can be prosecuted for any content that maybe deem illegal, thus every site now wants to cover their own ass with these kind of rules.
 
Likes: OldmenKing

Volta

Active Member
Apr 27, 2017
372
307
#32
SESTA and FOSTA is actually what drove sites like discord and reddit to a mass self-moderation this year against loli content, the two bills make it so that the host site can be prosecuted for any content that maybe deem illegal, thus every site now wants to cover their own ass with these kind of rules.
I don't see how an anti-prostitution and trafficking bill effects internet companies that aren't using real life models, what did i miss?
 
Sep 28, 2017
55
44
#33
I don't see how an anti-prostitution and trafficking bill effects internet companies that aren't using real life models, what did i miss?
Because they could just say "This site has illegal content, there's a possibility that there are illegal transaction going on, it is very possible that this is an illegal prostitution ring online, TAKEDOWN" The problem is in the text themselves, the wordings of that is considered a viable standard to consider what is prostitution through sites is worded so ambiguously that a little push of logic can make anything that is lewd a possible evidence against a site. Here this site may not be the most accurate but at least at the wording part they describe it right:
 
Likes: yoyomistro

yoyomistro

Well-Known Member
Jan 15, 2017
881
697
#34
If we ignore the reasons behind tumblr sticking a fork in it's own ass and proclaiming "I'm done" for a moment, the more interesting thing will be watching where the 18+ content providers, especially the writers, which i admit is what i'm aware of tumblr for at all, will go after the "tumblrpocalypse". Will standard blog sites follow suite, panic and drop the portcullis? will a unanimous replacement appear? or will they just scatter to the wind and never be quite as centralised ever again.

It's interesting how big internet companies are starting to get really twitchy about adult content in the last few years, what changed? is there a particular peculiarity that as a UK resident I've missed that explains this, perhaps some new laws in the US or a spate of prosecutions?

Also i understand what was mentioned about MindGeek (pornhub et. al.), they may as well have said "free market share, sign me up", like bloody crows on a corpse.
In addition to the stuff @Cybuster said, Apple also has a large part to do with it. Ever since they broke into the online space, they've wanted to keep anything within their sphere of influence controlled and sanitized, and people who want a piece of the pie capitulate to their demands. Also, remember when all of the big tech companies "coincidentally" removed Alex Jones from all of their platforms at the same time? Is he a blowhard and does he deserve to lose all his money in the libel and slander cases he's brought on himself? Yes. But why did every platform except for Twitter decide to wipe him off their sites within hours of each other? They've become de facto public infrastructure, but they are still private entities, and are regulated as both service providers and media companies. It's an interesting conundrum, and hopefully the solution to it doesn't leave us all with a lot less freedom than we had before they became so huge.
 
Likes: Cybuster

Volta

Active Member
Apr 27, 2017
372
307
#35
In addition to the stuff @Cybuster said, Apple also has a large part to do with it. Ever since they broke into the online space, they've wanted to keep anything within their sphere of influence controlled and sanitized, and people who want a piece of the pie capitulate to their demands. Also, remember when all of the big tech companies "coincidentally" removed Alex Jones from all of their platforms at the same time? Is he a blowhard and does he deserve to lose all his money in the libel and slander cases he's brought on himself? Yes. But why did every platform except for Twitter decide to wipe him off their sites within hours of each other? They've become de facto public infrastructure, but they are still private entities, and are regulated as both service providers and media companies. It's an interesting conundrum, and hopefully the solution to it doesn't leave us all with a lot less freedom than we had before they became so huge.
Don't start me on apple, we'll be here for weeks, the "holier than though" thing they try to pull with their public image, the whole "we're saving the planet", "vegan karmic goodness", "homeopathic spiritual harmony" BS while simultaneously pricing way above the level of the product or service they provide while giving a mediocre service and fucking over as many smaller operations as they physically can to eliminate future competition, not to mention the whole Chinese labour thing, yeah other people do it too but it takes a proper bunch of assholes to fill the bingo card on this one. *quells internal rant*

This falls back to internet and tech monopolies and governments not being ready, willing or sufficiently knowledgeable enough to deal with them in a positive way, youtube, patreon, FB, twitter, google to name a few are all extremely dominant in their respective fields and have earned it, however no normal business would have been allowed to become that dominant, sky is constantly under question for this and they have a far lesser market share in their business than FB or google. Pretty much every government in the developed world is openly anti-monopoly and yet none of them do anything about it, god knows what they even could do, perhaps separate youtube and google?.
 
Likes: yoyomistro

HiEv

Active Member
Sep 1, 2017
177
143
#36
There is a problem with Blogger (a.k.a. Blogspot), in that, while they do allow adult content, they don't allow you to monetize it. (See .) So they can easily use that rule to shut down any adult games people sell, if they want to.

WordPress.com is OK with showing nudity, but not "sexually explicit acts". That said, they don't have any rules which would block monetized game links, so it might be better than Blogger. (See .)

Anyone know of any other good, free blogging sites which would work as well or better?
Answering my own question, here are some other alternatives to Tumblr:

: Allows images as long as they're not sexually suggestive images of subjects under 18 ( ).

: Also allows adult content, but for some weird reason .

(NSFW): Here's another one that allows adult content, and (FYI) they even show nudity on their registration page. Their .

: Another blogging site, which even . Its .

: You're responsible for your own content there. Their .

: Literally a blog site for adult content. .
 

anne O'nymous

Well-Known Member
Modder
Jun 10, 2017
1,537
1,552
#37
Pretty much every government in the developed world is openly anti-monopoly and yet none of them do anything about it, god knows what they even could do, perhaps separate youtube and google?.
The problem is more complex since Internet companies are monopoly de facto :
1) You are just facing your computer so, in contrary to real world, you don't see "a list" of all the alternatives. In the end, you use what you know about, not because you want, but because you don't even know that there's an alternative, nor how to access it.
2) They all cost the same, nothing. So, what define your choice is the reliability and/or the number of people you know that use the same service. In real life, you can meet your friends here one day, and there another day. You can eat here on Monday, and there on Tuesday, and so on. On Internet, your friend are on "this" site and it's the only place where you'll find them. As for your adult games, you always go find them on F95, despite the many other place where you can find most of them.


Politics can do whatever they want, no Internet companies (except MindGeek) effectively strangle their competitors. They do a lot of barely legal stuff, but not this one.
You are free to start your own Facebook-clone if you want, but you'll not succeed because people will not migrate to your starting, and so empty, site. It's not Facebook fault. It's just that you have no reason to go on a social media site where you know no one. So, you'll perhaps start to use it in parallel to Facebook, and convince few people you know to follow you. But like you they'll continue to use Facebook, because the majority of their contact are there. This will last until the day you grow bored to switch from one to the other, and will stay to facebook because it's where you'll be sure to find everyone.
There's also more than 40 search engines... Still like everyone I'm sure that you use Google first, right ? You know about Bing and Yahoo, perhaps also about Qwant and Ask, but if you use them, it's to compare the result and decide that Google is still the best one.

The truth is that no Internet company is effectively a monopoly. It's we, the users, who make them looks like that. Whatever how evil we think they are, we don't care about their competitors until one mess so much that it become mandatory ; like here with tumblr, or previously with Patreon.
Still, how many people effectively left Patreon ? Not this much, because for a patron it mean loosing the games you pledge for, and for an author it mean loosing your pledges. And the same will apply for Tumblr. People producing adult content are forced to quit, but the other will stay ; they'll just stop following the adult blogs and don't even try to find where they now are.
It's Internet. The content don't come to you, all in the same place. You don't go here, then browse the magazines in case a new one is better than the one you actually buy. You don't even go here and buy a magazine talking about this, one talking about that, and so on. No, on Internet you need to go to the room where the magazine is made, and read it while it's made. So, you stick to a single one, never hear about its competitors. Then once you've finish with this one, you go to another one, and so on.

Welcome to a world where it's not monopolies who mold us, but us who create monopolies... and really mess with the use we do of this power.
 
Likes: yoyomistro

yoyomistro

Well-Known Member
Jan 15, 2017
881
697
#38
The problem is more complex since Internet companies are monopoly de facto :
1) You are just facing your computer so, in contrary to real world, you don't see "a list" of all the alternatives. In the end, you use what you know about, not because you want, but because you don't even know that there's an alternative, nor how to access it.
2) They all cost the same, nothing. So, what define your choice is the reliability and/or the number of people you know that use the same service. In real life, you can meet your friends here one day, and there another day. You can eat here on Monday, and there on Tuesday, and so on. On Internet, your friend are on "this" site and it's the only place where you'll find them. As for your adult games, you always go find them on F95, despite the many other place where you can find most of them.


Politics can do whatever they want, no Internet companies (except MindGeek) effectively strangle their competitors. They do a lot of barely legal stuff, but not this one.
You are free to start your own Facebook-clone if you want, but you'll not succeed because people will not migrate to your starting, and so empty, site. It's not Facebook fault. It's just that you have no reason to go on a social media site where you know no one. So, you'll perhaps start to use it in parallel to Facebook, and convince few people you know to follow you. But like you they'll continue to use Facebook, because the majority of their contact are there. This will last until the day you grow bored to switch from one to the other, and will stay to facebook because it's where you'll be sure to find everyone.
There's also more than 40 search engines... Still like everyone I'm sure that you use Google first, right ? You know about Bing and Yahoo, perhaps also about Qwant and Ask, but if you use them, it's to compare the result and decide that Google is still the best one.

The truth is that no Internet company is effectively a monopoly. It's we, the users, who make them looks like that. Whatever how evil we think they are, we don't care about their competitors until one mess so much that it become mandatory ; like here with tumblr, or previously with Patreon.
Still, how many people effectively left Patreon ? Not this much, because for a patron it mean loosing the games you pledge for, and for an author it mean loosing your pledges. And the same will apply for Tumblr. People producing adult content are forced to quit, but the other will stay ; they'll just stop following the adult blogs and don't even try to find where they now are.
It's Internet. The content don't come to you, all in the same place. You don't go here, then browse the magazines in case a new one is better than the one you actually buy. You don't even go here and buy a magazine talking about this, one talking about that, and so on. No, on Internet you need to go to the room where the magazine is made, and read it while it's made. So, you stick to a single one, never hear about its competitors. Then once you've finish with this one, you go to another one, and so on.

Welcome to a world where it's not monopolies who mold us, but us who create monopolies... and really mess with the use we do of this power.
Yep, that's the problem with Internet "monopolies", they exist by virtue of human nature... As a websites audience grows, that causes them to grow by virtue of their growth. Not an easy problem to solve as most of these companies don't even charge for their services in the traditional way, so they can't be taken down Microsoft style. And I'm pretty sure most of them won't make the mistake Microsoft did of packaging their tools in a way that excludes competition or purposefully skewing their advertising towards their services. There are far more subtle ways to drive traffic now anyway, most of which aren't susceptible to anti-trust measures...
 
Likes: anne O'nymous

forbidden101v

Active Member
Jr. Uploader
Jun 2, 2018
289
2,052
#39
This sanitation of internet porn only makes me want newgrounds to comes back. I want my 2006 absolute free reign of porn, flash games, and hentai flash games.
Newgrounds is still kicking it's just not popular like it was years ago and best part it hasn't changed really beyond allowing people to use more video file types.

Answering my own question, here are some other alternatives to Tumblr:

: Allows images as long as they're not sexually suggestive images of subjects under 18 ( ).

: Also allows adult content, but for some weird reason .

(NSFW): Here's another one that allows adult content, and (FYI) they even show nudity on their registration page. Their .

: Another blogging site, which even . Its .

: You're responsible for your own content there. Their .

: Literally a blog site for adult content. .
The Hero we need need but don't deserve.